‘Dracula’s Daughter’ Bad

Generally, I’m not that into live albums. They’re recordings of a concert I wasn’t at, and listening to an incomprehensible mass of other people having a really great time isn’t my idea of fun. I make an exception for Colin Meloy Sings Live, largely for the banter, but he does something that I find endlessly funny and endearing each time I hear it.

“Tonight, I’m going to play you the worst song I ever wrote. And it’s bad to the core.” Meloy says. “The fact that I put pen to paper is really terrifying. It makes one want to retire and become a college professor or something. It’s the sort of thing that shakes the very foundation of your being. But I’ll let the song speak for itself…”

I love a lot about his length intro to what’s ultimately a third of a song. The song is campy, it’s goofy. It’s a little catchy, it will get stuck in your head. But, he’s right: it is a far cry from the complex and often intellectual writing style of Meloy’s typical work. It’s a first draft of a song through and through.

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On the other hand, there’s another piece of media I unabashedly love: Mike Mignola’s The Amazing Screw-On Head, the story of a robot who helps Abraham Lincoln fight the forces of darkness and his former butler-turned-Zombie. What I really love about it is that Mignola (as I heard it), wanted to make a series out of it, but felt like he got everything he wanted to do out of a single issue of the comic. When he tried to adapt it for TV, he had the same feeling about the pilot episode: this is pretty much all it needed. (Also amazing vocal performances from Paul Giamatti and David Hyde Pierce).

After writing about my own recent first draft the other day, I started thinking about the Purgatory folder. The place that bad story ideas go to sit the rest of their days in incomplete mediocrity. This is different than my steamer trunk folder, where “meh” drafts go to marinate. But what sets them apart? What makes one story worth working on and the other less so?

I’m not really sure. But I figured it was worth rambling about for a few hundred words.

What I do know is that this is one of those “Your Mileage May Vary” scenarios, as some ideas that I can’t make work, someone else can. Then again, there are a ton of ideas that I think are dumb that someone else has already packaged and sold (I typically use this idea to calm myself when I’m worried that I’ll never get published).

Maybe the ‘this is the worst story ever written’ feeling that comes with your average first draft feels different when you know the potential could be a lot stronger. Perhaps it’s that you get to the end and the internal BS-o-Meter hasn’t tripped any alarms. It could even just be that I reach the end and am still madly in love with the idea, whereas another idea might be one I met at a party, took home and gave a fake number to in the morning. At the moment, I think it’s that I got to the end and saw some of things that were wrong with it, but knew I could fix them–see also, the reason people sink hours upon hours into Minecraft.

I don’t really know. So, I figured I’d ask the other writers out there: what’s your threshold for seeing a story through to the bitter end versus canning it forever?

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One thought on “‘Dracula’s Daughter’ Bad

  1. Pingback: Unfinished Business | The Unsure Runner

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